189 Sites
Chunhuhub
Stone carvings like gold filigree adorn the residences of those "who speak to the gods." The elaborate Puuc architectural style makes this ancient city a relic that remains almost entirely intact even after 12 centuries. Its greatest treasure is El Palacio.
Campeche
Sureste
1663
Coatetelco
This city was a dependency of Tula, attaining an important role through trade and religion. When Tula fell around 1000 AD, Coatetelco took its place in the west of the present-day state of Morelos.
Morelos
Altiplano Central
1748
Cobá
Important ancient Maya city in an area of lakes, from here the great sacbe’ob (long roads) were built, which helped it survive over many others until it was defeated by Chichen Itza. The round observatory, the great Pyramid of Nohoch Mul and the stunning inscriptions make it unique.
Quintana Roo
Sureste
1790
Comalcalco
This port city was the most western settlement of the Mayan culture and was occupied for a little over 1000 years. Its earthen architecture is distinguished by its brick cladding and mortar using lime from oyster shells.
Tabasco
Sureste
1817
Cuajilote
A Totonac city with a 3,000 year history in a very damp location, where the buildings are very tall and the plazas and ballcourts are wide. The are indications of a cult to Tezcatlipoca, the smoky black mirror. It was a great exporter of colorful bird feathers.
Veracruz
Golfo
1872
Cuarenta Casas
This site in Arid-America, where the original farmers constructed their city in the caves, eight centuries ago. The steps, adobe walls, roofs made of woven palm, stylized figures of animals, pinewood beams, everything is beautifully integrated into the landscape.
Chihuahua
Norte
1689
Cuetlajuchitlán (Los Querende)
Inhabited for 900 years from 600 BC by Olmec and Mezcala culture people. It is constructed with long stone blocks forming plazas, places of worship and a water supply system. A modern highway was forced to go through a 160 foot deep tunnel to avoid damaging the site.
Guerrero
Occidente
1724
Cueva de la Olla
Impressive remains of habitation in the zone which date back to 5500 years BC, the oldest in Arid America and all of Mexico. Remarkable for the enormous communal granary in the shape of a cooking vessel, marvellously preserved, with a structure of twisted dry leaves covered in clay.
Chihuahua
Norte
1690
Cueva Grande
Eight centuries old, one of the largest sites of gatherers and the first settled farmers in Arid America. Among the many constructions in the shelter of the cave, it preserves the remains of a watchtower, so the inhabitants could keep a lookout and be in communication with the important enclave of Huapoca.
Chihuahua
Norte
1691

LEGAL NOTICE

The contents of this website belong to the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia de México, and may be downloaded and shared without alterations, provided that the author is acknowledged and if is not for commercial purposes.

Footer MediatecaINAH

Guardar
Lugares INAH

Idioma