San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan
A very ancient and populous Olmec city. Strategically located along land and river transport routes. Enormous stone boulders were brought from the Sierra de los Tuxtlas, a volcanic mountain range, to make sculptures of colossal heads and thrones. The site began to be abandoned 29 centuries ago.
About the site

San Lorenzo Tenochtitlán was an Olmec city that commanded land and river transport routes. It occupied a large tropical island, bordered by navigable rivers and extensive floodplains in the lower basin of the Coatzacalcos River. The oldest period of occupation comprises two phases, the Ojochi phase and the Bajío phase, lasting from 1500 to 1200 BC.

The population grew dramatically between 1200 and 850 BC, and activities related to production and subsistence also increased, with a progressive interest in the cultivation of corn. One of the most remarkable construction activities was the alteration of the very land where San Lorenzo is located; millions of cubic meters of sedimentary infill were moved to reshape the site, creating multi-level terraces for habitation around the highest point of the site. Excavation of the housing areas shows an important social differentiation that is reflected in the construction techniques, some with basalt columns and red pigment floors, while other constructions are modest and were made with wood, clay and floors of local stone. In the perimeter of the housing areas evidence was found of productive activities such as obsidian implements, reuse of the basalt stone, the use of chapopote (tar) as a resin and glue, as well as areas that indicate animal butchering and food preparation areas.

Sculptures such as thrones and colossal heads carved from volcanic rock brought to the site from the Sierra de los Tuxtlas are another characteristic of San Lorenzo. It is possible that the colossal heads formed a straight line from north to south on the east side of the principal plaza.

Before 900 BC, San Lorenzo’s population had grown to 13,000, but the city and surrounding areas began to be abandoned between 900 and 850 BC; warfare, disease, and environmental change probably contributed to this process. By 850 to 600 BC, during the Nacastre phase, just 500 people were living in the area.

305017
INAH-FN/Fondo Prehispánico
FH94
D.R. © Marco Antonio Pacheco/Arqueología Mexicana
FH96
D.R. © Marco Antonio Pacheco/Arqueología Mexicana
FH95
D.R. © Marco Antonio Pacheco/Arqueología Mexicana
324974
INAH-FN
1500 a.C. - 600 a.C.

Preclásico Temprano a Preclásico Medio
1200 a.C. - 850 a.C.

Preclásico Temprano

Practical information
Temporarily closed
Monday to Sunday from 9:00 to 17:00 hrs

Free entry


  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
  • COM_CCK_Prohibido_tomar_fotografias
  • COM_CCK_Prohibido_tomar_video
  • No Flash
Se localiza sobre la Meseta de San Lorenzo, dentro del ejido de Tenochtitlan.

Services
  • Sanitarios
  • Toma corriente
  • Visitas guiadas
  • +52 (229) 934 9981
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Directory
Responsable Regional
Temaschtiani Atenco
+52 (229) 934 9981 y 934 5282
1877
304_B_san_lorenzo_1
Golfo
Museo de Sitio de San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan
Muy antigua y poblada ciudad olmeca. De gran importancia en la comunicación por tierra y por los ríos. De la Sierra de Los Tuxtlas se allegó enormes bloques de piedra que convirtió en admirables esculturas de cabezas colosales y tronos inmensos. Hace 29 siglos comenzó a ser abandonada.
A very ancient and populous Olmec city. Strategically located along land and river transport routes. Enormous stone boulders were brought from the Sierra de los Tuxtlas, a volcanic mountain range, to make sculptures of colossal heads and thrones. The site began to be abandoned 29 centuries ago.

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