• Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
    Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
  • Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
    Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
Cuetlajuchitlán (Los Querende)
Place of the red flowers, or the blighted place.
Inhabited for 900 years from 600 BC by Olmec and Mezcala culture people. It is constructed with long stone blocks forming plazas, places of worship and a water supply system. A modern highway was forced to go through a 160 foot deep tunnel to avoid damaging the site.
About the site
At the end of the Late Preclassic, Cuetlajuchitlan was one of the main settlements of the north of the present day state of Guerrero. It was discovered in 1991 during works on the Autopista del Sol (highway). The archeological heritage was successfully preserved thanks to the Los Querende tunnel, which is also the name the locals give the site.

Only two acres of the archeological site’s 35 acres have been excavated. It is known that the settlement was occupied in 800 BC, although it reached its peak between 200 BC and 200 AD. It is distinguished by its robust buildings made from massive carved stone blocks. The stone figurines linked to the Mezcala culture belong to this stage.

During this period of splendor, the elite governors of the settlement came under the sphere of influence of the groups inhabiting the valley of Morelos, who had close ties with Teotihuacan, the great metropolis of the Central Highlands, at the same time as maintaining their relationships with other parts of the state of Guerrero, such as the central region.

The architectural style, with its pre-urban characteristics, is notable for the hundreds of columnar blocks of stone, which were both functional and ornamental. The settlement layout is also characterized by the presence of residential complexes in the far north and south. The settlement’s principal functions and ceremonies were in the central part, distributed around square sunken patios with small central stairways on the four sides.
800 a.C. - 200

Preclásico Medio a Clásico Temprano
200 a. C. - 200

Preclásico Tardío

Did you know...
  • Although we are not certain of the identity of the inhabitants, signs of the Olmecs have been found in Guerrero. Towards the final period of its occupation Cuetlajuchitlan was part of the Mezcala culture zone.
Practical information
Temporarily closed
Monday to Sunday from 9:00 to 17:00 hrs

Free entry

Tiene una sala introductoria.


  • Extra fee for video cameras
  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
Se localiza en lo alto de una loma cercana al poblado Paso Morelos, en el municipio de Huitzuco, Guerrero.

From Mexico City, take the Autopista del Sol towards Acapulco. In Iguala, turn onto the road to Huitzuco, pass the Paso Morelos toll booth and continue along a dirt road until you reach the site.

Services
  • Centro de atención al visitante
  • Estacionamiento
  • Sanitarios
  • +52) (747) 471 7121
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Directory
Jefe del Departamento de Protección y Resguardo de Bienes Culturales
Héctor Torres Calderón
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+52 (747) 472 2604
1724
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242_A_cuetlajuchitlan_raices_marco_antonio_pacheco_1
Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
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Marco Antonio Pacheco/Raíces
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Occidente
Ocupada nueve siglos desde el 600 a.C. por olmecas y gente de la cultura Mezcala, la integran bloques de piedra alargada ordenados en plazas, adoratorios y un sistema de abasto de agua. Para que no la dañara una carretera moderna, se la hizo pasar por un túnel a 50 metros de profundidad.
Inhabited for 900 years from 600 BC by Olmec and Mezcala culture people. It is constructed with long stone blocks forming plazas, places of worship and a water supply system. A modern highway was forced to go through a 160 foot deep tunnel to avoid damaging the site.
Lugar de flores rojas o lugar marchito
Place of the red flowers, or the blighted place.

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