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El Conde
The site was named in the mid-nineteenth century after Manuel Conde, owner and builder of the sixteenth-century El Prieto hacienda.
Located in Naucalpan de Juárez, not far from the Periférico Norte (highway) in the northern suburbs of Mexico City, this site offers something unusual, a palace belonging to the fifteenth century pre-Hispanic nobility, one of the few examples of the civic architecture of the period.
About the site
The El Conde archeological site in the district and municipality of Naucalpan de Juárez presents a large square platform. The history of the settlement goes back to the final stage of Teotihuacan (600-800), since fragments of ceramic material have been found from this period. Remains from the Toltec period (800-1100) and Early Postclassic (1200-1430) have also been found.

This great platform might also have been the site of a palace or tecpan because there is an east-west oriented access stairway, on both sides of which rooms were appended, a very common feature for this type of construction. The architectural shape of the platform is typical of the palaces found in the Valley of Mexico in the Late Postclassic, as can also be seen in several pre-Hispanic and colonial codices, including the Quinantzin Codex.
600 - 1430

Posclásico Tardío

Did you know...
  • Page 39 of the Mendoza Codex has a drawing of Moctezuma’s tecpan showing the lower rooms occupied by warriors, so it may be assumed that these rooms were used to house the warrior class.
  • This is one of the few existing examples of civil architecture from the Late Postclassic period.
Practical information
Temporarily closed
Tuesday to Sunday from 9:00 to 17:00 hrs.

Free entry


  • Extra fee for video cameras
  • Extra fee for professional cameras
  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
Se localiza en la calle Ozumba núm. 15, colonia El Conde, Municipio de Naucalpan de Juárez, Estado de México.

In Mexico City, take the Periférico Norte beltway in the direction of Unidad Cuauhtémoc, exit at Primero de Mayo Ave., turn right onto J. F. Kennedy, Andrés Atoto and Ozumba, as far as the junction with Texcoco.

Services
  • Sanitarios
  • Visitas guiadas
  • +52 (722) 167 1325
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Directory
Responsable
Sonia Georgina Sosa Chávez
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+52 (722) 21 39 581
1705
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Altiplano Central
En Naucalpan de Juárez, no lejos del Periférico norte, se encuentra esta zona que ofrece algo poco común: un palacio de la nobleza prehispánica del siglo XV, que constituye una de las escasas muestras de arquitectura civil de esa época.
Located in Naucalpan de Juárez, not far from the Periférico Norte (highway) in the northern suburbs of Mexico City, this site offers something unusual, a palace belonging to the fifteenth century pre-Hispanic nobility, one of the few examples of the civic architecture of the period.
El nombre le fue dado a mediados del siglo XIX en referencia a Manuel Conde, dueño de la Hacienda El Prieto que se construyó en este lugar durante el siglo XVI.
The site was named in the mid-nineteenth century after Manuel Conde, owner and builder of the sixteenth-century El Prieto hacienda.

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