• INAH-CINAH Campeche
    INAH-CINAH Campeche
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  • INAH-CINAH Campeche
    INAH-CINAH Campeche
  • INAH-CINAH Campeche
    INAH-CINAH Campeche
  • INAH-CINAH Campeche
    INAH-CINAH Campeche
  • INAH-CINAH Campeche
    INAH-CINAH Campeche
Tabasqueño
In the late twentieth century this site was named after someone from the state of Tabasco, who lived to the north of the site.
Monumental architecture in the Chenes style, the principal structure or Palace-Temple has a superb facade with designs of animals. Its inhabitants had incredible skills for supplying water to the community by drawing from two springs deep in caves as well as constructing a series of chultunes (cisterns) for collecting rainwater.
About the site

Given Tabasqueño’s location, on raised ground, the site’s former inhabitants accessed water from two sources: two springs to the east and the west of the settlement’s central area; two caves in the middle of the site; and a series of “chultunes” or underground rainwater collection reservoirs. These cisterns were generally bell- or bottle-shaped and coated in stucco to prevent filtration, and they could store between 1,300 to almost 16,000 gallons of water.

The main buildings at Tabasqueño form three architectural groups. The constructions are characteristic of the Chenes style of architecture, dating from the Late Classic (650-850 AD) and notable for the profusely decorated façades. In Group 1 there are remains of Structure 1 or the “Palace-Temple”, the most well-known construction at the site with an imposing zoomorphic façade. This two-tier building is abutted to the south by a plaza measuring 200 feet (north-south) by 130 feet (east-west).

The concentration of monumental architecture and presence of hieroglyphic sculptures and inscriptions strengthens the argument that Tabasqueño was an important regional settlement given the rarity of Chenes sites with hieroglyphic inscriptions and reliefs. Santa Rosa Xtampak and the eight stelae reported there are located some 28 miles away as the crow flies. Dzibilnocac, which also has stelae and monoliths, is located 17 miles from Tabasqueño. San Miguel Pakchén (Xpulyaxché de Maler), where a small stela has been found, is located just three miles to the northwest. In that same direction, but 20 miles from Tabasqueño, is an archeological site called Dzehkabtún which has various stelae with glyphs and a number of sculptures.

Teobert Maler (1895) was the first person to discover and report on the site. Eduard Seler (1916) described the main building based on the earlier studies. Alberto Ruz (1945) mentioned some details of the buildings that were still standing. Ricardo Robina (1956) reported on architectural details and the layout of the buildings on a terraced hill. Harry Pollock (1970) summarized the existing information and drew up a detailed study of his visit to Structure 1, at that time one of the finest examples of the Chenes façade style. David Potter (1977) made a brief summary of the information from Tabasqueño. Paul Gendrop (1983) drew the site’s buildings and made their comparison easier. Abel Morales and Betty Faust (1986) made the first archeo-astronomical analyses of the site. Renée Zapata (1987) drew up a preliminary map of Tabasqueño. George F. Andrews (1986) contributed with further architectural details about Tabasqueño. Sprajc and Sánchez Nava (2013) reassessed and studied various issues of the site’s pre-Hispanic astronomy.

Agustín Peña undertook the earliest conservation works at Tabasqueño in 1979. Antonio Benavides C. (1992) carried out consolidation work on the tower and some sectors of the Palace. Later, under the supervision of Ramón Carrasco (2003), work was carried out at the Palace-Temple, Structure 1-A and Structure 3. Sara Novelo and Antonio Benavides C. were responsible for overseeing the transport of sculptures (2009) and carved stones (2013).

Tabasqueno_1
INAH-FN
650 - 1250

Clásico Tardío a Posclásico Temprano
750 - 900

Clásico Tardío

Did you know...
  • The Palace-Temple has 10 chambers on two floors, and the building was originally painted bright red.
  • Tower structures are mainly found in the Chenes region, with examples at Chanchén, Nocuchich and Tabasqueño.
  • Tabasqueño’s four monuments with reliefs and hieroglyphs were carved between 900 and 1000 AD.
An exert point of view
Antonio Benavides Castillo
Antonio Benavides Castillo
Centro INAH Campeche
Archeological site
Tabasqueño
Practical information
Temporarily closed
Monday to Sunday from 8:00 to 17:00 hrs

Free entry


  • Extra fee for video cameras
  • Sundays free for Mexican citizens
  • Free entrance for Mexican students and teachers
  • No Smoking
  • No entry with food
  • Pets not allowed
Se localiza a 7 km al noroeste de Dzibalchén

Services
  • Centro de atención al visitante
  • Estacionamiento
  • Sanitarios
  • +52 (981) 816 8179
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Directory
Encargada de Operación de Zonas Arqueológicas del Centro INAH Campeche
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+52 (981) 816 9111, exts. 138016 y 138017
Tabasqueño
Structures
1675
309_A_000
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_1
INAH-CINAH Campeche
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_2
INAH-CINAH Campeche
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_3
INAH-CINAH Campeche
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_4
INAH-CINAH Campeche
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_5
INAH-CINAH Campeche
309_A_tabasqueno_archivo_inah_6
INAH-CINAH Campeche
Sureste
Fascina su arquitectura monumental estilo Chenes. La estructura principal, el Palacio-Templo, tiene una soberbia fachada zoomorfa. Asombra el conocimiento de sus habitantes para acceder al agua mediante dos aguadas, dos cuevas en el corazón del sitio y una serie de chultunes para recolectar la lluvia.
Monumental architecture in the Chenes style, the principal structure or Palace-Temple has a superb facade with designs of animals. Its inhabitants had incredible skills for supplying water to the community by drawing from two springs deep in caves as well as constructing a series of chultunes (cisterns) for collecting rainwater.
Recibió este nombre a fines del siglo XX, ya que al norte de este sitio vivía una persona procedente del estado de Tabasco.
In the late twentieth century this site was named after someone from the state of Tabasco, who lived to the north of the site.

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