189 Sites
Huandacareo (La Nopalera)
Originally a typical Cuitzeo Lake settlement, the same site was developed into a seat of public administration for the Tarascan state, where justice was imparted, rituals were celebrated and rulers were buried, and therefore it did not have a large population.
Michoacán
Occidente
1741
Huapalcalco
The earliest archeological site in Hidalgo, with remains of cave paintings and a dramatic backdrop formed by sheer rock faces.
Hidalgo
Altiplano Central
1734
Huápoca
The rocky shelters of the Chihuahua sierra house dozens of human settlements separated by great distances. The houses are three and four stories high, inside the caves and built of moulded clay. Their “T” shaped doors are a characteristic of Paquimé.
Chihuahua
Norte
1692
Huexotla
Situated near Texcoco, this pre-Hispanic city was one of the most important settlements of Acolhuacan. It covered an enormous area, extending beyond the boundary marked by a great wall 765 yards long by 23 feet high.
Estado de México
Altiplano Central
1707
Iglesia Vieja
Its strategic position on the Pacific coast was of great importance for communicating the Altiplano (high plateau) with the south of Veracruz and the area of the Isthmus. Its monolithic architecture of blocks of stone—some weighing almost two tons—is surprising, as well as its altars, stelae and beautifully carved sculptures.
Chiapas
Sureste
1682
Ihuatzio
Together with Pátzcuaro and Tzintzuntzan, Ihuatzio was once a seat of the mighty Purépecha state. This extensive site has only been partially explored. The huatziri or elevated walkways and the Plaza de Armas, with two semi-circular pyramids called yacatas, are particularly impressive.
Michoacán
Occidente
1742
Ixcateopan
The Mexica conquered this town and turned it into an important trading and ceremonial center. This was the site where they accumulated and redistributed the tributes they received from the region. There are temples, rooms and open spaces with the remains of red stucco on the floor.
Guerrero
Occidente
1726
Ixtépete
Situated on the outskirts of Guadalajara, this was an important trading center. Apparently its society was very hierarchical, since artisans and the common people lived in small surrounding neighborhoods, separate from the residences of the elite. The principal temple is worth a visit.
Jalisco
Occidente
1739
Ixtlán del Río (Los Toriles)
A unique archaeological site in Nayarit, outstanding because it contains one of the few circular temples found in Mesoamerica, together with other buildings. It was the hub of the “Copper Route” which connected, via the Pacific coast, the southwest of the present-day United States with central and southern Mesoamerica.
Nayarit
Occidente
1755

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