INAH Museums Network

126 Museums
Museo de Sitio de Tres Zapotes
Archeological site
The Olmec region has the longest record of continual occupation. The museum houses: the oldest stela in Mesoamerica, an extraordinary stone with the “long count” for the whole calendar, the first colossal head to be discovered and other artefactual evidence of these remarkable sculptors and workers in precious metals of the earliest civilization.
Veracruz
Museos
448
No
448
Museo de Sitio de Tzintzuntzan
Archeological site
Shows the development of the Tarascan capital and its inhabitants who were notable silver and goldsmiths, potters, unvanquished warriors and builders of yacatas (round based temples). A glimpse of the religion, wars and working lives of these town dwellers.
Michoacán
Museos
437
437
Museo de Sitio de Xochicalco
Archeological site
A pioneer ecological museum, incorporating the history of the flora and fauna of this ancient human enclave, showing the development of Xochicalco culture over more than a thousand years.
Morelos
Museos
450
No
450
Museo de Sitio de Xochitécatl
Archeological site
Since the eighth century BC the ancient Tlaxcalan culture ascribed women preeminent roles as givers of life, wise women and governors. This was exceptional in Mesoamerica. The museum has a multitude of artifacts testifying to the fact: ceramics, ornaments, offerings and utensils.
Tlaxcala
Museos
451
No
451
Museo de Sitio de Zultepec-Tecoaque
Archeological site
An Acolhua city neighboring the state of Tlaxcala with a conflict-riven border, but also an important trading point during the hegemony of Teotihuacan and Texcoco. Part of the force of Pánfilo de Narváez, who fought against Hernán Cortés, was captured here, a critical event which left numerous remains.
Tlaxcala
Museos
4096
No
4096
Museo de Sitio del Templo Mayor
Archeological site
The Great Teocalli (temple) that amazed the Conquistadors remains a testament to the magnificence of the Tlatoani chiefs and the religiosity of their people; it was also the cosmic center of Mexica rule. A unique museum showing the remains of the original construction and its valuable monuments.
Ciudad de México
Museos
452
No
452
Museo de Sitio en Comalcalco
Archeological site
This is where the Fire God, Aj Pakal Than, reigned in the 18th century AD, whose funeral offerings are exhibited, together with a collection of jewellery and other pieces made of shells, bone and stone from this great Maya city, built of clay bricks bearing extraordinary reliefs.
Tabasco
Museos
431
No
431
Museo de Sitio en Tizatlán
Archeological site
On the site of the former archeologists’ shelter, the museum was built in 1930 and was recently renovated. Tizatlan was one of the four fiefdoms of the Republic of Tlaxcala alongside Tepeticpac, Ocotelulco and Quiahuixtlan and it has structural remains from the late pre-Hispanic era, together with a very early Christian chapel.
Tlaxcala
Museos
445
No
445
Museo de Sitio Jorge R. Acosta en Tula
Archeological site
The archeologist Jorge A. Acosta (1904-1975), discovered the great Atlantes of Tula and other finds. The museum recreates the ancient Tollan Xicocotitlan: with sculpture, ceramics, stelae, offerings and gods (Quetzañcoatl, Tecatlipoca) and the vast population, inheritors of Teotihuacan.
Hidalgo
Museos
395
No
395

LEGAL NOTICE

The contents of this website belong to the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia de México, and may be downloaded and shared without alterations, provided that the author is acknowledged and if is not for commercial purposes.

Footer MediatecaINAH

Guardar
Lugares INAH

Idioma